ANTICHOLINERGIC DRUGS

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          Anticholinergics are drugs that block the action of acetylcholine. They block acetylcholine from binding to its receptors on certain nerve cells. They inhibit parasympathetic nerve impulses. These nerve impulses are responsible for involuntarily muscle movements in the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, urinary tract, and other parts of your body. The nerve impulses help control functions such as salivation, digestion, urination, and mucus secretion.

Blocking acetylcholine signals can decrease involuntary movement, digestion, and mucus secretion. If you take an anticholinergic, you may retain urine and experience dry mouth.

 

1. NATURAL ALKALOIDS: 

Atropine

Hyoscine (Scopolamine)

 

2. SEMISYNTHETIC DERIVATIVES:

Homatropine

Atropine methonitrate

Hyoscine butyl bromide

Ipratropium bromide

Tiotropium bromide

 

3. SYNTHETIC COMPOUNDS

a. Mydriatics: 

Cyclopentolate

Tropicamide

 

b. Antisecretory-antispasmodics:

Quaternary compounds: 

Propantheline

Oxyphe-nonium

Clidinium

Pipenzolate

Methylbromide

Isopropamide

Glycopyrrolate

 

Tertiary amines:

Dicyclomine

Valethamate

Pirenzepine

 

c. Vasicoselective:

Oxybutynin

Flavoxate

Tolterodine

 

d. Antiparkinsonian:

Trihexyphenidyl (Benzhexol)

Procyclidine

Biperiden

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